View Single Post
Old 06-20-2019, 05:16 PM   #51
aron
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Natal Transvaal
Posts: 5,185
Default Regarding Plagiarism

1. I recall reading the Publisher's Preface to the Second Edition of the Spiritual Man, supposedly the only book Watchman Nee ever wrote, where the publisher noted that much of the material was merely copied, unattributed, from others. But he said that was a Chinese custom to show appreciation. (I am going by memory here).

Here is the note from the CFP version of Spiritual Man. Watchman Nee's preface:

"I am not the first to advocate the teaching of the dividing of spirit and soul. Andrew Murray once said that what the church and individuals have to dread is the inordinate activity of the soul with its power of mind and will. F. B. Meyer declared that had he not known about the dividing of spirit and soul, he could not have imagined what his spiritual life would have been. Many others, such as Otto Stockmayer, Jessie Penn-Lewis, Evan Roberts, Madame Guyon, have given the same testimony. I have used their writings freely since we all have received the same commission from the Lord; therefore I have decided to forego notating their many references."

2. On this forum someone noted that much of Witness Lee's Life-study was apparently cribbed from a series of 19th-century Sunday School lessons.

Here:

Quote:
Originally Posted by YP0534 View Post
I think perhaps Mr. Tomes missed Mr. Lee's actual source.

Compare:
http://books.google.com/books?id=Mtx...A145&lpg=PA145

Note the reference to "evergreen tree" which does not appear in the Vincent note.

I obviously haven't compared all these references and it doesn't alter the fact that there is an unattributed source or sources involved but this is, to my mind, even more eye-opening.

It looks to me like, at least for this example, the process began with review of Peloubet's Select Notes On The International Sunday School Lessons, a comparison with the Vincent material was done for thoroughness and clarity (that's where the word "destitute" came from, in addition to the St. John's bread point), and then a summarized and enhanced form of Peloubet's note became Lee's footnote on this topic...
and here:

Quote:
Originally Posted by YP0534 View Post
Is anyone familiar with the matters referred to in these volumes?

http://books.google.com/books?id=aBUAAAAAYAAJ

http://books.google.com/books?id=96tJAAAAIAAJ
__________________
"Freedom is free. It's slavery that's so horribly expensive" - Colonel Templeton, ret., of the 12th Scottish Highlanders, the 'Black Fusiliers'
aron is offline   Reply With Quote